Pattern Testing: New Horizons Designs Girl’s Portlander Pants & Shorts

This post may contain affiliate links. By purchasing a pattern though these links, you’re providing support for this home seamstress to continue to bring you reviews and sewn up, modeled views of patterns. I thank you!

It’s been quite some time since I’ve been involved with pattern testing.  I have not had the time! But I felt like getting my sew-jo on and was excited to be a part of New Horizons Design’s testing group for their latest pattern.  I have tested for Terra before what feels like eons ago for the monkey bum pants.

New Horizons Designs has a women’s version of the Portlander Pants and it was time to take it to “Mommy and Me” level with the release of the Girl’s Portlander Pants and…Shorts!  The shorts option is what I tested.  But wait! Get them both as a bundle!!

I can tell you right off the bat what I like about the pattern is that there is a separate cutting line for the shorts. Which seems obvious but what I mean is that it’s not just a line at some length down from the crotch along the seam of the pants cut line. There’s a separate line that curves down from the crotch and away at the sides creating a really cute flare on the leg.  Pair it with the Girls’ Key West Tank (also available for Women) in the swing style, which is what I’ve done here, and you’ve got the perfect summer outfit.  Join the New Horizons Designs Facebook group and find out how you can get both the Women’s and Girl’s version of the Key West tank for free!

Pattern Description

PDF FEATURES –
Layers: Yes
No Trim Pages: Yes
Print Shop Size Offered: Yes
Other Features I like: Company Name, Pattern Name, Pattern Piece, Cut Quantity, Seam Allowance and Hem Allowance are indicated on every pattern piece (as well as Grainline and Stretch) | There are links at the bottom of each page to other parts of the PDF making navigation simple.

This pattern has a knit waistband (no elastic) with optional drawstring detailing.  Along with a pants version and a shorts version, there are optional patch pockets. I threw the whole kitchen sink into my shorts and even did some reverse coverstitch stylings which I feel does a great job of breaking up the solid color and making it more playful.  You need a coverstitch machine to do this but there are faux coverstitch stitches on some regular sewing machines. To make sure my reverse coverstitching lined up with the pocket, I basted the pocket piece on very close to the outer edge then when I flipped the shorts over, I could align the middle needle of the coverstitch machine with the basting stitch. Easy peasy.

Fabric options are listed in the pattern description in the listing but I used a cotton/spandex french terry for this pair. I used a cotton/spandex jersey for my fit muslin and it’s also a great choice.  Others used a double brushed poly which gives the pants a wonderful drape, gave the flare to the leg further accentuation, and they just looked so dang comfortable.

Fit

Going by the measurement chart was spot on for my daughter (24″ hip, 22″ waist, 48.5″ tall) and I ended up cutting a 5T width wise and a 7 for the length.  I realized after sewing my final pair I could have gone up to a 6 for width only because the french terry I used is a little on the thick side.  But that’s all on me. My fit muslin was perfection.

Sewing it was simple and they really take no time even when including all the options.  The seams are trued nicely so I don’t get weird triangle shapes of fabric at the seams and notches for pocket placement were on target as well. Terra considered all feedback from the group and ended up increasing the rise for sizes 4T and under to better accommodate diapers.

I’m glad I jumped on this round of testing as it was a fun experience working with Terra who was always there to quickly answer questions and make any revisions that came up along the way.  You will not be disappointed with this quick sew for a summer staple.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I was chosen as a pattern tester for the Girl’s Portlander Shorts and therefore given the pattern only for the purposes of the testing. This blog review was unsolicited and opinions and recommendations are solely my own.

Diaper Stocking Preview- OMMO AIOs and No Touch Pocket Diaper

Diaper Sale!

I need to freshen up my PUL prints so I will be offering this stocking at 15% off my regular retail price to clear out my PUL stock and get new prints in.  There are (10) Magnum Opus All-In-One diapers and (1) lonely pocket diaper of my No-Touch design.

The OMMO AIOs will be $26.49 with (1) detachable ruffle AIO available for $32.49. The pocket diaper will be $17.49 with an insert. All diapers have a stay-dry inner.

DETAILS:

WHEN: Thursday, May 11 at 8PM Eastern (which is 5PM Pacific)
WHERE: In my Etsy shop. Please note that items are still available to others until a purchase has been made. Carting the item does not guarantee you will get it.
PRICE: All OMMO AIO are $26.49 except for the ruffle diaper which is $32.49. The No-Touch pocket diaper will be $14.49 without an insert and $17.49 with a fold-over soaker.

New to the Magnum Opus All in One diaper? Here’s a quick review which goes over all the reasons why I love this diaper design.

OMMO All-In-One Inner

The AIO diaper is a true AIO in the sense that the soaker is permanently attached to the diaper and includes the waterproof layer so no cover is required.  It is constructed so that there are two pocket openings on the inner; one at the rear and one at the front. Attached at each of these openings is one soaker flap, for a total of two. These soaker flaps get tucked into the inner when on the baby and when the diaper is dirty, toss it in the pail; the petals will agitate out in the wash (remove solids first, of course).  These are the key features that make this the perfect AIO:

  • Easy to keep clean (which I can’t do if the soaker is inaccessibly sewn onto the interior layer) – the flaps agitate out in the wash allowing water to flow through the diaper as well as allowing water to get to the soaker petals

  • Quick to dry (which I can’t do if the soaker is inaccessibly sewn onto the interior layer) – since there are two flaps, the number of layers of each can be minimized making it quick to dry and since they agitate out in the wash they are exposed also allowing them to dry quicker.

  • Easy on. Easy off. Caregivers (not familiar with cloth diapers) rejoice! No unstuffing before throwing into the diaper pail. Which means I don’t have to swim through the pail before laundry to unstuff diapers after grandma comes over…and no special instructions required for the nanny or day care

  • NO EXPOSED FLAPS PEOPLE! There are no flaps for poop to get caught under or to flap aimlessly around when I spray it with the diaper sprayer. Or to get bunched up between legs effectively rendering it useless…

Sewing the Inner of the Opulent Monsters Magnum Opus AIO

Ruffle Diaper

There’s this cloth diaper pattern that I’m pretty crazy about: Opulent Monsters’ Magnum Opus AIO.  The most amazing AIO design I’ve come across in my cloth diapering career that spanned about 5-6 years between two children. It’s such an amazing design that it’s turned into my only requested diaper by my customers and am thrilled to offer it in my shop (when time permits for a stocking).

I’m in the middle of sewing about a dozen right now and thought I’d shoot a quick video of the most challenging part for those new to sewing up the pattern.  In this video I quickly demonstrate my process of sewing the inner layer: attaching the absorbent inset to the PUL guard on the Opulent Monsters’ Magnum Opus AIO Cloth Diaper.

Sewing Resolutions: Love Notions Margot Peplum

This post may contain affiliate links.

This is my first entry documenting my sewing resolutions after explaining in my last blog post about wanting to learn pattern modifications for humans with curves (as opposed to tiny humans with straighter lines).

I was asked by Opulent Monsters to sew up this beautiful double brushed polyester/spandex.  This fabric is amazingly soft and as you can see has wonderful drape  for this top.

When I saw the fabric I immediately decided on the Margot Peplum by Love Notions as I recently purchased it and couldn’t wait to try it.   Upon coming to grips that my body type falls under the triangle/pear category, I read that peplum tops are flattering to these types of shapes.  Not to turn this into a complete pattern review, but I have always loved Love Notions patterns as they please my brain’s desired for order. They’re well put together, internally linked, and include layering in addition to no-trim pages.  I have sewn the children’s patterns in the past so thought I’d try my shot at one of her adult patterns.

Take me to the final pictures |How I modified the pattern

Free Notion (I’m a bit obsessed with this site if you couldn’t tell) put together a chart that explains the measurements pattern designers draft for.  This is very helpful information when determining which modifications you’ll need to make to the flat pattern before starting or even when choosing which patterns to purchase.  I am of the opinion any flat pattern modifications that can be made before sewing a muslin, the better. Here’s the info on what size Love Notions patterns are drafted for.  She drafts for a 5′-5″ tall woman with a B-cup.  By the way, did you know that your bra size is different from your sewing size? No? Me neither! She talks about that too.

I started with the basic knowledge of whom she drafts for and since I am a B-cup-ish, didn’t need to do any bust adjustments to the bodice but I did add length per the instructions in the pattern.  I’m 5′-6″ so added 1/2″ to the bodice under the bust line.  This pattern does indicate the bust line which is a super helpful marking to have.  Knowing the location of your bust apex  (this is a great article on bust apex adjustment – which is roughly the line of your nipple location) allows you to determine where in the pattern you needed to add or subtract length.  For me, my apex is roughly in line with the bust line on the pattern so I added my length below the bust line.  This may be a bit crude and not appropriate technique but to quickly determine that my apex was at the bust line on the pattern, I held the paper pattern up against my body, placed the shoulder seam approximately where it would be located on my shoulder and molded the paper pattern around my chest.

The steps I did to do a simple length modification to the princess seam bodice is below the pictures. This pattern paired with the double brushed poly/spandex make a perfect combo.

The options I chose to sew (and there are a few!) are the princess seam bodice, circle skirt, and elbow length sleeves.  Here are a couple quick shots of how I altered the pattern and here are the steps (click on images to enlarge):

  1. I drew a line 1.5″ under the bust line and will add my length at this line.  Some patterns indicate a lengthen/shorten line and it’s always best to make that modification at the point suggested to maintain any geometry that may be happening at either side of the line (i.e. a curved hem on a skirt or waistband on pants). You’ll want to draw this line perpendicular to the grainline. This typically ensures that the changes you make will be parallel to the ground.
  2. Draw a second, vertical line perpendicular to the line you just drew (in green on my pattern mod). Or you can use the grainline mark already on pattern if it crosses your first line you drew. You’ll use this to ensure proper alignment when splitting the pattern apart.
  3. Cut the pattern at the first line drawn.
  4. If you’re lengthening, grab another piece of paper (medical paper, freezer paper, printer paper) and draw a line.
  5. Draw a second line parallel to the first. The distance between these two lines is how much length you want to add. In my case, I need to draw the line 1/2″ away.
  6. Also draw a vertical reference line perpendicular to these two parallel lines to line up with the vertical line drawn on the pattern piece.
  7. Place the upper part of the pattern piece that was cut apart on the top reference line and tape into place
  8. Place the lower part of the pattern piece on the bottom line drawn and tape into place. Don’t forget to align those vertical reference lines. You’ll see in the image below, I was actually able to use the grain line as my reference for alignment.
  9. Use a french curve or hip curve to blend between the cut portion of the pattern piece.  Princess seams have some geometry to pay attention to and the instructions in the Margot tell you how to blend but I just chose the bust line and then the hem line and used my styling curve tool to blend down between these points.
  10. Repeat on all pattern pieces making sure your lengthen/shorten line is in the same spot on each pattern.  For the princess seamed bodice, there are 4 pattern pieces to alter.

I did do a super quick muslin of just the bodice portion to make sure the bottom of the bodice was hitting where the pattern said it would. And 1/2″ is really all I needed. I didn’t see any other modifications that needed to be made.  However, I’ve been wearing this over the past couple weeks and have noticed there’s some pulling at my right shoulder so either I have some sloped shoulder issue or I didn’t sew it quite right. I’ll see on my next one if it resolves.

Those were super simple pattern modifications for my beginning project.  The rest of this top fits beautifully right out of the envelope and I cannot wait to make more.  I’m so jazzed this pattern fit me so well with almost zero modifications I will be making the Love Notions Willow Wrap dress next so stay tuned!

 

Sewing Resolutions: Learning Pattern Modification for Grown Ups

Beginner's collection of supplies for pattern modifications.

Beginner’s collection of supplies for pattern modifications.

Yoga Mom

Yoga Pants! My “momiform”

I don’t normally do New Year resolutions. But I am also a bit OCD in that I’m a planner. I was thinking about what direction I wanted to take my sewing business and now that I’m not bogged down in the architectural exams, have also been lamenting on development of my sewing skills. I’ve been sewing for kids for over 8 years but realize besides a pair of yoga pants and a skirt, I don’t sew for myself. Or my husband for that matter. So I would like to resolve to sew one item a month for myself and blog about it to hold myself accountable and maybe pass on a thing or two. Because I don’t know how to sew for bodies with curves.

So I will begin with the caveat that I do not have any pattern altering education and so will be learning the world of pattern alteration as I go from on-line sources and textbooks. Take anything I say with a grain of salt rimmed margarita and If you’d like to come along for the journey, I have included what basic tools I am starting with below.

First, for any other novice to grown up sewing, I feel it’s important to note something based on my observations in the sewing groups on Facebook. Do not expect a pattern to fit you right out of the envelope. I see a fair amount of complaints about patterns not fitting right but don’t forget designers draft based on a standard  In fact, there is an international standard for body measurements published via ASTM. And standards can’t determine if you’re long in the torso, short in the leg. Or have a dowager’s hump. Or that you sneak ice cream after the kids are in bed and carry all your weight in your ass (like myself). The other observation I see is women thinking they’ve done something wrong or feel shameful due to sizing issues. For best fit you’ll need to make some modification most of the time.

I’m looking into starting a capsule wardrobe and Free Notion is a great resource and has so many awesome blog posts but this is a must read: Know Thyself

“If MOST women fit RTW clothes, I wouldn’t see women in public with straps falling off their shoulders, gapping at the neckline or armscye. Women who chose to size their jeans to fit their hips, unable to wear them without a belt to hold them up at their waist – or tugging at them constantly to keep them up.   You wouldn’t see so many major retailers relying on the “flexibility” of spandex in wovens and knits to provide the greatest range of fit in their garments. They’re designing for “average” and finding materials to fit the masses.”

Secondly, know your body type (sort of goes along with Know Thyself). Yeah. I never got the memo. I’ve never been into fashion so didn’t pay attention to these things. But I have finally come to grips that I am a pear (triangle) shape. It wasn’t until I started sewing that I even knew that was a thing. And it makes so much sense! That’s why I could never wear wrap dresses. Or why skinny jeans actually make my hips look bigger. And why I should probably not wear ankle boots. And why I’m even more committed to sewing for myself. I can fit the clothes to me instead of me to the clothes.

I’m finding I’m really digging the technical aspects of pattern drafting and modification as it parallels my architecture career quite well. It brings me back to simpler times where I stayed up three nights in a row trying to get a project done for design studio in school. But without the dreaded charettes. Before 9PM became my bedtime. But I digress. Here are the tools I’m starting with (from left to right – and these are not affiliate links):

170105 PttrnDraft-1

  1. A roll of medical paper. Yes. The same stuff your bare ass sits on while uncomfortably waiting half naked 15 minutes past your appointment time on the doctor’s table. It’s awesome for reworking patterns since it’s see-through like tracing paper. However, it’s flimsy so if you have finalized your fit, I would transfer it to something more stable. Something like: butcher’s/freezer paper, template plastic, or oak tag board, which is what professional sewing houses use (it’s pricey though).
  2. Centering ruler. I don’t use it for pattern making but still think it’s pretty cool. I use it to center patterns on my fabric if I’m using a panel or want to get the design on the fabric perfectly in the center. My hubs bought me one from the local drafting supply store but there’s plenty on Amazon.
  3. Soft tape measure. To move around those womanly curves.
  4. Seam gauge
  5. Dritz Styling Design Ruler. This has a few tools in one and I decided to start cheap and bought this instead of all of the following: hip curve, a set of French curves, straight ruler, graph ruler (super helpful for seam allowances)
  6. Pair of trusty paper cutting scissors…because there is a lot of cutting involved.
  7. Pattern  notcher (sooo sooo handy)
  8. Set of different colored Sharpie markers
  9. Tape and Tape Dispenser

I’ve already modified my first pattern which I will blog about next as I was asked by Opulent Monsters to sew up some beautiful double brushed poly. Though I admittedly found there wasn’t much that needed to be done to alter the pattern but it’s a good start. I might as well dip in my toe instead of diving in head first. At least I didn’t start with a pair of pants.

Let’s Celebrate – I’m Reopening! {Giveaway Over}

Architectural Registration Exam Restults

Architectural Registration Exam Restults

I announced last fall that I was suspending Red Dog Studio to focus on completing the Architectural Registration Exam to obtain my architecture license.  I didn’t get started until March of this year but found out today that I have passed my last exam!  7 out of 7. Instead of studying every waking minute of my life I would like to turn my attention back to sewing!

GIVEAWAY {Giveaway Over}

I want to share my excitement with you and offer a $70 store credit – $10 for every division of the exam I had to take.  This credit is good for one year and you will also get either a stalk-free pass or priority in any custom list or group order I open.  You can use the credit all at once or as you go but it must be used within a year of issue. The credit will not be applied towards shipping.

You can even use it right away if you see anything you like in my Etsy shop! Even fabric I have listed!

SCHEDULE

Here’s my schedule for the next few months and I do still have a full time job outside of the home which is why I’m not able to provide regular stockings. I have found opening a customs list has been most productive for me.

October
Finish 2016 Holiday Pajama Group Buy (orders have already been taken and fabric has arrived)

November
PUL Blow Out Diaper Sale – I’d like to clear out my older PUL and buy some fresh prints. I will offer a 15% off semi custom diaper sale with my remaining PUL remnants. You get to choose from either the ever so popular OMMO AIO (I was the first seamstress to get approved to sell from the pattern) or my newer No Touch Style Pocket diaper. You choose the outer and I choose coordinating inner and snaps.

December
I will be taking December off as things always get crazy during the holidays and I’d love to sew some wardrobe staples for myself and the kids. If the SLAL custom fabric comes in, however, I will sew the custom group I opened for camis and scrundies and get that out the door as soon as I can (order form is closed).

January
I will most likely open back up my ever so popular customs list! I will make anything your heart desires with any of my in stock fabrics or send me your own fabric.  I will also be restructuring my prices for 2017.

PLEASE!! Tell your friends about Red Dog Studio. I take pride in my craftsmanship and have upgraded my machines to include a high end serger and coverstitch machine to provide you a professionally finished garment with amazing stitch quality.  I source high quality fabrics with most of my stash coming from European and organic knit manufacturers as well as custom group prints. Enter the Giveaway below…

{GIVEAWAY OVER}

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms and Conditions:

  1. By entering this giveaway, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  2. Open to US and International entrants.
  3. Entrant releases Facebook of any wrong doing. This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook or Rafflecopter.
  4. Grand Prize: a $70 Red Dog Studio shop credit to expire within one year of issue. NO CASH VALUE. Prize will not be applied towards shipping costs.
  5. There is no entry fee and no purchase necessary to enter this giveaway.
  6. No cash alternative to the prizes will be offered.
  7. Winners will be notified by email provided through Rafflecopter. If a response isn’t received within 24 hours a new winner will be chosen.
  8. Entrants are providing information to Red Dog Studio and not to Facebook or Rafflecopter.
  9. Giveaway opens Wednesday, October 19 and closes Saturday, October 22 at 10PM Mountain time.
  10. Void where prohibited by law.

Mini Halloween Themed Stocking!

160924halloween-4As some of my customers know, I have taken a hiatus to take my architectural registration exams. Well, I only have one more left and thought I’d throw in this mini stocking during study breaks.  This was super fun for me as I haven’t sewn like this in quite some time.  If all goes well, I’ll be done with my exams on October 15 and maybe think about starting up some super small stockings again around the holidays. I get people asking me about making cloth diapers again so that would be a fun place to start. For now, here are the stocking details.  There will be a coupon code for 10% off a shirt/pants combination in any listing containing a top.

WHEN: Saturday, October 1 | 11AM Mountain (10AM Pacific, 1PM Eastern)
WHERE: My Esty Shop – All items are ready to ship and will ship out by Monday, Oct 3
Please review my Shop and Shipping Policies
WHAT:

  • (4) pairs of Basic Bunz ($22.99) – Perfect for cloth diaper booties, these pants are “Grow With Me Style” and are intended to fit between the ages of 1-3.  These are made with Opulent Monster’s Basic Bunz pattern which do NOT have a circle bum on the back but are drafted to accommodate fluff.  Print and coordinating stripe are a custom print fabric by Opulent Monsters.
  • (1) 2T Peplum with hi/lo hem – NBC Inspired ($24.99) – Print and coordinating stripe are a custom print fabric by Opulent Monsters
  • (1) 3/4 Paradise Pullover – NBC Inspired ($27.99) – Print and coordinating stripe are a custom print fabric by Opulent Monsters
  • (2) Harem Pants – Mint Triangles – Size 18M & 2T ($19.99) – Main and coordinating cuff are a gloriously soft, organic cotton euro fabric
  • (2) Harem Pants – Pink Triangles – Size 18M & 2T ($19.99) – Main and coordinating cuff are a gloriously soft, organic cotton euro fabric
  • (2) Peplum – Pink Bats – Size 18M & 2T ($24.99) – Main and coordinating cuff are a gloriously soft, organic cotton euro fabric
  • (2) Raglan Shirts – Mint Bats – Size 18M & 2T ($24.99) – Main and coordinating cuff are a gloriously soft, organic cotton euro fabric

OMMO AIO Giveaway {Over}

I was so excited to be an OMMO seamstress that I sent in a diaper for licensing approval as soon as I could! While the licensing requirements are no longer, Red Dog Studio became the first approved OMMO WAHM. Once that happened it seemed they were all I was sewing!

For those that don’t know, I am taking a break from RDS for a little while.  So while I can’t fulflill orders, I can at least have a giveaway! (Open to US and International customers. Free shipping to US but International shipping will need to pay $6).

The diaper up for grabs is the diaper I sent in for approval.  It is a stay dry OMMO with a wicking jersey inner.  It is different than the other OMMO I make in that I use different tags now and no longer stitch the middle of the soakers (which I did to keep them from bunching but figured along the way it wasn’t needed). I would like to point out that there is also a small spot near one of the rise snaps. It may be a spot of dirt from my snap press and may easily wash out with some dish soap and a light scrub with a toothbrush.

To enter, I’d love to know what creations you’ve seen along the way that you like! Conversely, let me know what items you would buy this summer from RDS. Shorts, shirts…?  Click on any sections of my Portfolio page to have a look.

Terms and Conditions:

  1. By entering this giveaway, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  2. Open to US and International entrants. Please note shipping: free US shipping; discounted international shipping.
  3. Entrant releases Facebook of any wrong doing. This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook or Rafflecopter.
  4. Grand Prize: One ready to ship OMMO AIO as pictured – no cash value/alternative and no substitutions.
  5. There is no entry fee and no purchase necessary to enter this giveaway.
  6. No cash alternative to the prizes will be offered.
  7. Winners will be notified by email provided through Rafflecopter. If response isn’t received within 24 hours a new winner will be chosen.
  8. Entrants are providing information to Red Dog Studio and not to Facebook or Rafflecopter.
  9. Giveaway opens Sunday, February 28, 2016 and closes Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 10PM Mountain time.
  10. Void where prohibited by law.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Attaching Waistband Elastic Using a Serger and a Coverhem Machine

img_03011I made this video a year ago and thought it’s a bit long and dry so never posted it.  But this question keeps coming up in my sewing circles so I have resurrected this video in the hopes it’s helpful to those new to coverhem machines or need a little help on visualizing how to attach waistband elastic.

This method is not new but is an alternate method to doing a casing which is a more “traditional” method.  For me, this method is slightly quicker, I like the look, and I don’t feel as if there’s as much bulk making the band more comfortable for the wearer.  Not to mention by using a coverhem machine, I can be confident my stitching will have the added stretch and, therefore, durability needed for children’s wear.

What if you don’t have these newfangled machines?  You can still do this method on a regular sewing machine.  Where I use the serger, you can use a zig zag stitch. Be sure you align the edge of the elastic right to the raw edge of the waist instead of leaving the 1/8″ I like to do. I only leave the gap so I have a nice trim edge from the serger.  Then when you align the waistband on your machine to sew, you’ll want to make sure the right-most zig/zag falls right at the edge of the waistband.  Then to top stitch, use your twin needle.

A note about the coverhem machine: In the video I am using the Janome 1000CPX and have since upgraded my machine to the Babylock BLCS-2. I may re-do this video so it’s not such a yawner using this machine.

If you want to get right to the part where I stitch on the coverhem, fast forward to minute 12:00…that’s right. 12:00.  I told you I was a bit windy. But I don’t like to leave anything out.

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Babylock Coverstitch – Double Fold Binder Attachment

 

10mm (3/8″) finished binding at neckline

 I purchased my first coverstitch machine about a year ago. The Janome 1000cpx.  It is a fantastic machine but I could not fall in love with it like others have.  It sure sewed a mean hem but every time I tried to do anything more than 2 layers of fabric, I always prepared myself for skipped stitches or uneven feeding.  I was lucky enough to take home the Babylock BLCS-2 coverstitch machine to play with and have been so impressed with how it sews.  I already have the Imagine, which is the best non-industrial serger in the world in my biased opinion, so moving over to the Coverstitch was a breeze.

I was able to take home a binder attachment to try out and decided to do a video of just how easy it is to apply binding to the edge of a knit garment.  There are many other binder accessories available for this machine but I thought I’d start slow.  The one thing I love about the Babylock vs the Janome is I did not need a special adapter plate to mount the binder to and the Babylock machine actually also comes with the necessary mounting screws.

I am illustrating the 10mm knit/woven double fold bias binder.  10mm is the finished width of the binding and is about 3/8″.  The instructions call for cutting your binding strip 36mm which is about 1-3/8″ wide.  The instructions call for cutting knit on the crosswise grain (perpendicular to the selvage as one would normally cut knit) and on the bias for woven (cutting woven on the bias produces the most stretch which is important when using a woven to bind around curves).

This by no means is a definitive “how to” because I am still figuring this out but I was so excited I wanted to share.  Please feel free to comment on this post or the video if you have great tips or tricks for binding attachments and what accessory you can’t live without.

Thank you to Sew Vac of Boulder for allowing me to play!